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Josip Stošić: Nacrti Za Pet Mojih I Jednu Vašu Pjesmu

Studentski Centar Sveucilista u Zagrebu, Josip Stosic, Zagreb, 1976. Paperback. Book Condition: Good. French poet and critic, Stephane Mallarme (1842 – 1898) was a major French symbolist poet, and his work anticipated and inspired several revolutionary ar
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Bit International: Complete 1-9

The bit international journal was published as part of the activities of the New Tendencies movement. The objective of the editors was: “to present information theory, exact aesthetics, design, mass media, visual communication, and related subjects, and t
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Ivan Picelj: A (Edition a) 4

A (Edition a) 4. Serigraphie Brano Horvat. Ivan Picelj, vlastita naklada, Zagreb 1964. Founded by the painter Ivan Picelj edition a represented the aesthetic and ideological positions of the international art momevent New Tendencies, which took root in Za Anti gravi graphitron
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Mangelos: Shid-Theory

Screenprint on cardboard, 8 pages, published by the artist. 14 1/10 × 9 4/5 in. 35.8 × 25 cm. As he himself accurately foresaw, Dimitrije Bašičević Mangelos died in 1987 at the age of 66; in his manifesto Shid Theory, published and exhibited in
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Victor Vasarely: Gorgona 4 (FRA)

Gorgona no 4. Francuski / French 4/61. VictorVasarely 1961 Nice condition screenprinted cover and screenprinted insert page (each): 8 1/4 x 7 9/16" (21 x 19.2 cm) privée Vasarely's Gorgona includes several drawings from that period and the author's
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WOW 3 (Bosch + Bosch)

WOW 3 (Bosch + Bosch) Treći broj je objavljen ofset štampom 1975. godine na kunstdruk papiru dimenzija 18 x 50,5 cm, na šest strana, u 150 primeraka. Matković je ovde dao prikaz svoje galerije u stanu, bračni par Poznanović je prikazao Franka Vakarija (Franca Vaccaria) (Firenca). Jedna strana je objavila listu autora Prve jugoslovenske izložbe umetničke knjige. Objavljen je novi tekst Endrea Tota (Tóth Endre), kao i eseji Miška Šuvakovića (Novi Sad) i Predraga Šiđanina. Ostali autori: Branko Andrić (Novi Sad), Irena Dogmatik (Irene Dogmatic) (USA), Klement Padin (Clemente Padin) (Urugvaj), Horhe Karabaljo (Jorge Caraballo) (Urugvaj), Gabor Tot (Tóth Gábor) (Budimpešta) i Šandor Pincehelji (Pinczehelyi Sándor) (Pečuj). Izvor: Olga Kovačev Ninkov, viši kustos Gradskog muzeja Subotica
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Maj 75 B

Maj 75, broj B, 1978; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Grupa jedan, dva tri, Mangelos, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 E

Maj 75, broj E, 1981; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar; na naslovnici Zlatko Kutnjak "Izgažena umjetnost" 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Mangelos: Manifesti: noart

Manifesti: noart. Zagreb: Atelier Tošo Dabac, 1978. Black. Dvojezično (hrvatsko-engleski) izdanje za drugu samostalnu izložbu Dimitrija Bašičevića Mangelosa, održanu u Atelieru Toše Dabca, Zagreb 1978. godine. Predgovor Nena Dimitrijević. Stanje - odlično. Silkprint on paper. Published on the occasion of the exhibition at ATD, Zagreb, 1978. Artist's edition. With a foreword by Nena Dimitrijevic. Dimitrije Basicevic Mangelos (1921-1987), - a member of avangarde group Gorgona and participated in the Nove tendencije movement. In Croatian and English language. Very rare. Autor: Dimitrije Bašičević Mangelos Izdavač: AtD - Atelier Tošo Dabac Izdanje: prvo/first Godina: 1978 Uvez: meki Format: 14x19 Stranica: 52
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OHO: Gobe v Knjigi

Gobe v Knjigi (Mushrooms in a book) Iztok Geister (I.G. Plamen) and Marko Pogačnik Ljubljana, 1968. Drawings of mushrooms, circular holes in the front cover and the leaves and colored paper chips acting with the holes. Card covers, spiral binding. 9.1 x 22 cm 40pp letterpress, offset, collages and die-cut pages, spiral bound, 20 sheets
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Nuša i Srečo Dragan

Nuša i Srečo Dragan Tri dopisnice za crtežima Sreče Dragana iz 1970. godine. Crteži i tekstovi vezani uz film H2O. 14x9cm Dopisnica 1: Roka na maski na obrazu Dopisnica 2: Roka v zraku na zraku Dopisnica 3: Roka v zraku na nogi Nusa was born in Jesenice in 1943 and her partner Sreco, in Spodnji Hrastnik in 1944. Nusa earned her degree in Pedagogy and Sociology at the University of Ljubljana. Sreco earned his degree in painting at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana, where he completed his postgraduate studies under prof. Zoran Didek. In 1971 Sreco attended a class in New Media in London. Between 1967 and 1988 Nusa and Sreco worked together artistically as a couple. In 1969, they filmed the first video in the former Yugoslavia (White Milk of White Breasts). During 1968-1969 they participated in the work of OHO. Their beginnings belong to reizm, arte povera, conceptualism, contextualization of language, installation, and usage of new technologies, film and video. Since 1998 Nusa has lived and worked as an independent video artist in Ljubljana. Sreco Dragan has lectured at the Academy of Fine Arts in Ljubljana since 1989, where he is a professor of video and new media. His latest art practice is focused on net-video, Internet art installations and computer animation.
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Maj 75 Ć

Maj 75, broj Ć, 1979; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Antun Maračić 42,33 x 29,13 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 Č

Maj 75, broj Č, 1979; Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Fedor Vučemilović, Goran Petercol 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 Dž

Maj 75, broj Dž, 1980;Jovan Čekić, Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Stanislav Filko, Tomislav Gotovac, Vladimir Gudac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Sergio Pausig, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Fedor Vučemilović, Iris Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 Đ

Maj 75, broj Đ, 1980;Vlasta Delimar, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac, Pino Ivančić, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Vlado Martek, Rajko Radovanović, Mladen Stilinović, Darko Šimičić, Zoran Popović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 D

Maj 75, broj D, 1979; Vlasta Delimar, Željko Jerman, Boris Demur, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlado Martek, Marijan Molnar, Mladen Stilinović, Sven Stilinović, Goran Trbuljak, Fedor Vučemilović 21x29,5 cm Maj 75 is in prestige list in Artists' Magazines: An Alternative Space for Art (The MIT Press) by Gwen Allen From 1978 to 1984, seventeen issues of “May’75” were published, each issue coded by letters of the alphabet. The magazine was produced by assembling individual works. The artists made their own pages on A4 paper and then bound them together into a magazine format. In addition to the original six, over fifty artists from Ex-Yugoslavia, Germany, Ex-Czechoslovakia, and Italy amongst other countries were invited to contribute their work to the magazine. Each issue including original art work, ready made artwork, ciclostile print work or silkscreen work, texts, concepts, projects, attitudes, ironical and political opinions, collages and photographs which lost almost nothing of their original quality when reproduced or multiplied. Pages were occasionally reproduced by screenprinting in the workshop of Željko Jerman and Vlasta Delimar. Most pages however, were hand-made. By repeating the same, simple and quickly executed work, the artist diminishes the significance of the original. Issues of “Maj’75” with their spontaneous use of available materials and technologies are obviously there to be used and handled, and although they are full of original works, there is nothing of a deluxe edition about them. “Maj’75”, financed by the artists themselves, was usually handed out for free during the exhibition-actions to other artists, friends, critics or passers-by. Later, when the Group of Six Artists no longer exhibited on the streets, distribution was usually managed through personal contacts and through mail. The magazine was never sold through bookstores or in galleries, not because its authors did not want this, but because it was impossible. Each private enterprise was met with countless obstacles in communist countries. “Maj’75” was thus completely unofficial. This had one advantage in that it avoided censorship, but also a drawback, in that the magazine remained little known outside a narrow circle. Branka Stipančić
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Maj 75 G

Maj 75, broj G, 1981; Darivoj Čada, Željko Jerman, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Živko Kladnik, Vlado Martek, Lela Mujkić, Rajko Radovanović, Darko Šimičić, Raša Todosijević, Egist Zagoričnik, Franci Zagoričnik, Orest Zagoričnik, Boris Demur, Tomislav Gotovac; korice izradio Tomislav Gotovac "Prošenje"
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Maj 75 H

Maj 75, broj H, 1982; Tomislav Gotovac, Boris Demur, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Željko Kipke, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Pino Ivančić, Marijan Molnar, Živko Kladnik, Branka Stanković, Franci Zagoričnik, Zan Futranovitch Toupillon, Rajko Radovanović
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Maj 75 L

Maj 75, broj L, 16.1.1984;Nenad Bogdanović, Mangelos, Antun Maračić, Raša Todosijević, Jusuf Hadžifejzović, Željko Jerman, Vlado Martek, Zlatko Kutnjak, Vlasta Delimar, Darko Šimičić, Rajko Radovanović, Boris Demur
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Sven Stilinović: Podroom

Artist Book 21x29,5 cm Radna zajednice umjetnika Podroom, Zagreb 1979. Samostalna izložba Svena Stilinovića se održala 6. - 13. ožujka 1979. Povodom te izložbe autor je objavio katalog s replikama radova i tekst. U tekstu piše o "velikim" radovima i objašnjava što ih čini velikima (dimenzije, što neobičniji materijal, višeznačnost i slojevitost). Smatra da umjetnici koji rade "velika djela" znaju gdje ih treba prezentirati, a to nisu mali prostori nego oni većih dimenzija i velikog značaja. Na ovoj izložbi izložio je seriju tekstova na papiru i dvije kamene kocke dimenzija 1 x 1 x 1 m, naziva Skulpura 1 i Skulptura 2. Skulpturu 3 je postavio u park Ribnjak 1. ožujka 1979., pa je u katalogu objavio dvije fotografije spomenute skulpture.
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Mladen Stilinović: Nemam vremena

Mladen Stilinović: Nemam vremena (I Have No Time) Artist Book Prvo izdanje iz 1979. godine. Zagreb. Vlastita naklada. Offset na papiru 7 listova, zaklamano Naklada 70 primjeraka
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Harold Pinter: Gorgona 8 (CRO)

Harold Pinter: Tea Party. Gorgona No. 8, 1965. Josip Vaništa, vlastita naklada. Croatian language edition. Tekst na hrvatskom jeziku. Vaništa sent Harold Pinter the seven issues of Gorgona that had already come out and asked him to “design his issue like Vasarely and others had done”. Pinter, in turn, sent his short story “Tea Party”, which was published in 1965. The Gorgona Group , was a Croatian avant-garde art group which consisted of artists and art historians: Dimitrije Bašičević-Mangelos, Miljenko Horvat, Marijan Jevšovar, Julije Knifer, Ivan Kožarić, Matko Meštrović, Radoslav Putar, Đuro Seder, Josip Vaništa, operated along the lines of anti-art in Zagreb between 1959 and 1966. Beside individual works linked to traditional techniques, the members proposed different concepts and forms of artistic communication and published the anti-magazine Gorgona - 11 issues. Autor: Harold Pinter Izdavač: Josip Vaništa, Zagreb Izdanje: prvo/first Godina: 1965 Uvez: meki Format: 20,8 x 19,2 Stranica: 14
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OHO: Knjiga Aleša Kermavnera

Aleš Kermavner 1946-1966 OHO, Ljubljana 1966 20,3x14,7 cm cjelokupno književno naslijeđe objavljeno je iste godine u Knjizi Aleša Kermavnera u kojoj su objavljeni i otisci kanala i ostalih objekata. Aleš Kermavner's suicide on April, 3, strongly affects his colleagues. His literary legacy is published the same year in the Book of Aleš Kermavner and also features imprints of ducts and other objects. V Ljubljani, Kulturna komisija pri univerzitet- nem odboru Zveze študentov Jugoslavije, t. Učne delavnice 1966.) (64) str.
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Marko Tadić: Thank You

Mixed Media. Unikat 1/1. Originalni radovi Marka Tadića. Artist's Book iz 2009. godine. Mixed Media. Unikat 1/1. Originalni radovi Marka Tadića. Artist's Book, iz 2009. godine - napravljen u notesu Journal, izrađenom četrdesetih godina dvadesetog stol
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